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This ESRC project evaluates and develop methods for the analysis of media content, in particular news. The substantive concern is with the portrayal of policy, politics and politicians, but this will also enable the application and methodological assessment of innovative approaches to media content analysis. Detailed description of the project. More

Authors

People who originated and developed this resource are based in the University of Loughborough. The original authors of this resource were Thomas Konig, Michael Billig, David Deacon, Peter Golding and Katie MacMillan at the Department of Social Sciences, University of Loughborough. They worked actively on the resource site until 2004. The ReStore team is intouch with the principal investigator concerning further updates and maintenance of this resource.

Original Project

The project funded by RMP tests and develops methods for the analysis of media contents particularly in news. The web site offers both original research and links to resources for the analysis of media content. This site lists a number of software, utilities etc used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of Textual, Video and Audio data. For more details please see

Quick Summary

The project -- embedded in and funded by the ESRC Research Methods Programme -- will test and develop methods for the analysis of media content, in particular news. The substantive concern is with the portrayal of policy, politics and politicians, but this will also enable the application and methodological assessment of innovative approaches to media content analysis. The project comprises four main elements:

  1. The exploration and testing of computer software packages for the analysis of media content. This will draw on earlier exploratory work at Loughborough.
  2. Discursive analysis of media texts drawing on the innovative work of the Loughborough Discourse and Rhetoric Group. Analysis of time series data, to explore the possibilities of such a form of content analysis using the exceptional resources of the electoral research data sets and the Media and Communication Research Archive at Loughborough.
  3. Comparative research on large data sets, exploiting their adoption in Finland of coding and content analysis methods explicitly copied from earlier Loughborough work.

Date of Restoration

This web resource has been fully restored into ReStore repository on 05/04/2009