ECONOMIC & SOCIAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
How systematic should you be?
The stages of a systematic review
1. Produce a review protocol / plan
2. Assemble a review group / advisory group
3. Formulate review question(s)
4. Conduct a thorough search
5. Select relevant studies
6. Appraise the quality of studies
7. Extract information from individual studies
8. Synthesise studies
9. Report what is known and not known
10. Inform research, policy and practice
The stages of a systematic review 
 


The ten steps of a systematic review are shown below.  In this section the steps are described consecutively, however, it is often more efficient and effective to work on several phases simultaneously.  The time required to complete each stage will be dependent on the requirements of a given review. 

Whilst the principles and techniques of systematic review are decribed in this area, it is not possible to provide a "blueprint" methodology or definitive advice on all of the methods.  This is because the use of systematic review in the management field is still relatively new and many methodological issues are still being explored.  Whilst the site and the advice contained within it should  inform researchers, all systematic reviews require crafting and adapting as appropriate, to suit the needs of a particular research project.  You may also decide not to conduct a full systematic review but might want to draw on some of the methods or approaches explained in this section.

 

The stages of a systematic review

  1. Produce a review protocol
  1. Assemble a review group
  1. Formulate the question(s)
  1. Conduct a thorough search
  1. Select relevant studies
  1. Appraise the quality of studies
  1. Extract information from individual studies
  1. Synthesise studies
  1. Report what is known and not known
  1. Inform research, policy and practice

 

 

The text on this page was created by Professor David Denyer, Professor of Organizational Change, Cranfield School of Management.